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Update 5: June 7 Election Results

Fifth update has Measure B lead increasing, now ahead by over one-and-a-third percentage points.

Latest update June 16 at 6:14 p.m.

No update from the ROV for Thursday, but Wednesday’s count from the Alameda County Registrar of Voters shows the count for Measure B to be 276 votes over the 55% threshold needed for approval. The count was issued at 5:07 p.m., June 15. Currently 11,408 votes have been counted in favor, and 8,842 against.

We have reached out to representatives supporting Measure B for comment and are awaiting a statement from AUSD. More updates to come.


Latest update June 14 at 6:16 p.m.

The numbers released today add almost 3,300 votes counted in Alameda’s Measure B school bond race. Unofficial Post Election Update #4 was posted Tuesday, June 14 at 5:18 p.m. by Alameda County.  The latest tallies show 10,469 (55.86%) in favor and 8,274 opposed, 0.86% past the threshold needed for approval. The County has now counted ballots cast by over 37% of registered Alameda voters in the primary election.


Latest update June 13 at 5:46 p.m.

More votes have been counted from the June 7 primary election. Another 54,000 mail-in voters’ ballots have been counted, bringing the total count to 225,679. The County has not yet declared the results to be official; Unofficial Post Election Update #3 was released at 5:15 p.m. on Monday, June 13. We will continue to monitor and share their results until they are official. County elections officials must report final official results to the Secretary of State by July 8, 2022. The Secretary of State will certify the results on July 15, 2022.

Alameda Post - Election Results for June 7, 2022 primary
Original photo by Robert Couse-Baker.

Alameda’s Measure B, previously trailing by one-third of a percentage point, has pulled just ahead of the 55% threshold of votes needed to pass. Alameda voters are currently 8,553 in favor, and 6,924 are opposed. The total votes cast at this point total 15,477. 55% of that total is just over 8,512 voters, a difference of just over 20 votes from the current tally. According to the ROV, 50,399 people are registered to vote in the City of Alameda.

In other County races, Alysse Castro has increased her lead to almost 52% over incumbent County Superintendent of Schools, L. K. Monroe, and it looks certain that Rebecca Kaplan and Lena Tam will be competing on November’s ballot for Third District County Supervisor.

State and national race standings are unchanged from our previous reporting. More to come.


Latest update June 10 at 5:45 p.m.

Alameda County’s official election site released an update late Friday afternoon. Mail-in ballots from 17.04% of voters have been tallied. Including votes cast on Election Day, a total of 171,457 ballots have been counted.

Measure B is still under 55% needed to pass, but has inched closer to that threshold, now standing at 54.67%. 6,784 votes in favor have been recorded vs. 5,625 opposed.

In other results, the County Superintendent of Schools race has seen challenger Alyssa Castro take the lead from incumbent L. K. Monroe. Castro now holds 50.49% of the vote. Challenger for Sheriff/Coroner Ysenia Sanchez now holds just over 50% in their race as well, up from 47% while incumbent Greg Ahern has dropped to 34%.

More updates to come as the County and State release further information.


Latest update June 9 at 6:12 p.m.

The latest tally from Alameda County’s Registrar of Voters at 5:27 p.m. today included votes from another 2.46% of the County’s voters, bringing the total of counted mail-in ballots to 12.20%. The previous meager tally of 1.21% of voters turning out on Election Day has not changed, putting overall turnout that has been counted at 125,946 votes.

Alameda’s school bond measure, Measure B, is getting further away from the threshold of 55% needed to pass. It now stands at 53.51% of voters in favor, down nearly another half percentage point. We will continue to monitor vote results until they are officially certified.

In two other races we reported on earlier, County Superintendent of Schools L. K. Monroe maintains their lead over challenger Alysse Castro, 51%–49%. And in the statewide Insurance Commissioner race, Robert Howell has moved into second place behind incumbent Ricardo Lara, according to an update at 3:24 p.m. today on the CA Secretary of State’s site.


After an extremely low turnout, initial election results are in from the June 7 primary with 100% of Alameda precincts reporting. As of 11:30 p.m., all the races have clear leaders at this point in the tally, with the sole exception being Alameda’s Measure B. Overall, a scant 1.21% of Alameda County voters cast ballots on Election Day, and only another 9.74% have returned ballots that have so far been counted. That makes a total of 102,804 total votes counted, or just 10.94% of the county’s 939,402 registered voters. For more detailed  and up-to-date election results please visit the Alameda County Official Election site and California Secretary of State Election results site.

Updated 11:39 p.m. with more accurate state counts for statewide races and updated Measure B numbers. Updated 12:01 a.m. June 8 with updated Alameda County turnout numbers. We will continue to update this article as new counts become available.

Federal Offices

In state-wide races, with about 63% of California districts reporting, Alex Padilla has a commanding lead in both senate races, with approximately 56% of the vote in each. The first race is to finish out the remainder of now Vice President Kamala Harris’ senate term, and the other to fill the seat for the next term. For the newly-assigned 12th district, popular East Bay Congresswoman Barbara Lee holds nearly 85% of the votes.

State Races

In State office contests, Governor Gavin Newsom coasted to an easy victory with almost 60% of the state’s vote. Brian Dahle currently is in second place with 15%. Current Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis was also comfortably ahead of all challengers with 55% of CA voters making her their choice.

Secretary of State Shirley Weber is leading her race with 61.7%, as are Treasurer Fiona Ma at 60.5% and Alameda’s own Rob Bonta, appointed Attorney General when Alex Padilla replaced Kamala Harris in the Senate, with 57%. Lanhee Chen led the pack of those seeking to become Controller with 34.7%, and will face Malia Cohen, who received just over 22% of votes cast, in November’s election, according to CA’s state-wide vote count.

Incumbent Ricardo Lara took the most votes for Insurance Commissioner, but not enough to avoid a run-off against challenger Marc Levine, while Sally Lieber was the top vote-getter for the Board of Equalization’s second district with just over half the votes cast. Incumbent Tony Thurmond was leading for State Superintendent of Public Instruction but, with only 47.5% of the vote, he will face a challenger in November. State Assemblymember for the 18th District, Alameda’s Mia Bonta, elected to fill her husband’s seat in a 2021 special election, ran unopposed, as did a trio of Superior court judges.

County Election Results

In Alameda County election results, incumbent County Superintendent of Schools L. K. Monroe narrowly fended off the challenge from Alysse Castro with 52% of votes cast. The hotly-contested race for Third District County Supervisor is led by Rebecca Kaplan with 39%, and former Alameda City Councilmember Lena Tam in second place at 30%. Tam was the most popular choice of Alameda residents, however, winning all but one Alameda precinct. They will face off on November’s ballot.

Another high-profile local race, to replace outgoing District Attorney Nancy O’Malley, will be decided in November between Pamela Price, who got almost 40% of the vote, and Terry Wiley, who received 31%. Incumbent Sheriff/Coroner Greg Ahern was bested by challenger Ysenia Sanchez, 47% to 36%, and they too will compete on November’s ballot. Alameda’s Phong La, County Assessor, Melissa Wilk, Auditor-Controller/Clerk-Recorder, and Henry Levy, Treasurer/Tax Collector, each ran unchallenged.

Alameda’s Measure B

The school bond measure [PDF], authorizing Alameda Unified School District to issue up to $298 million in bonds for upgrades and retrofits, would levy a property tax of $45 for each $100,000 of assessed value of real property value. It requires a 55% majority of votes to pass. It is the closest of all the races of this primary election. Currently voting stands at 53.91% in favor, down from 54.13% earlier in the evening. It is unclear if there are enough outstanding mail-in ballots to push the tally over the 55% threshold. We will be following this story further.

November General Election

We will keep track of any changes in posted election results. Run-off elections will happen in November for the races where no candidate took more than 50% of the vote. Alameda’s City offices will be on the ballot as well in the Nov. 8 election, including Mayor and members of City Council, the School Board, and the Hospital Board. Visit our Resources page to see all of Alameda’s current elected officials and other election information.

Adam Gillitt is the Publisher of the Alameda Post. Reach him at [email protected]. His writing is collected at AlamedaPost.com/Adam-Gillitt.

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July, 2022 – Alameda’s Innovative Streetcars​

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