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Italian Chief of Police Rides in 4th of July Parade

The chief of police of Varazze, Italy, one of Alameda’s sister cities, visited last week and participated in the Alameda 4th of July Parade. Comandante Mauro DiGregorio’s trip to our island city was facilitated by the Alpicella Family club, the International Police Association (IPA) Region 9, Alameda Sister City Association (ASCA), and the National Latino Peace Officers Association (NLPOA) Alameda County Chapter.

Alameda Post - a group photo of four people including Comandante DiGregorio from Italy
(L to R) Fire Chief Nick Luby, Comandante DiGregorio, Mayor Ashcraft, and Police Chief Nishant Joshi. Photo courtesy Brian Tremper.

Alpicella is part of the City of Varazze in Liguria, Italy. Many of our City’s Italian families came either directly from Alpicella or the surrounding region.

Comandante DiGregorio received training and tours of the Alameda Police Department, San Francisco Police Department, and Oakland Police Department. He also participated in the 4th of July Parade with the Alpicella Club and enjoyed lunch at Trabocco with Alameda Police Chief Nishant Joshi, Alameda Fire Chief Nick Luby, and Alameda Mayor Marilyn Ezzy Ashcraft.



The International Police Association is the largest and oldest worldwide fraternal police organization, according to their website. It is a nonprofit organization whose membership consists of active and retired law enforcement personnel. “The association promotes global and cultural friendship among peace officers,” the website states. “The emphasis of the organization is friendship.”

The nonprofit Alpicella Family club was incorporated in 1941 as a way to foster community among Italian descendants living Alameda County.

Alameda’s Sister Cities program works to promote cultural understanding and cooperation with cities around the world, and to strengthen international partnerships at the municipal and person-to-person levels.

The National Latino Peace Officers Association was founded in the early 1970s to eliminate prejudice and discrimination in the Criminal Justice System, particularly in law enforcement. The group seeks to prevent and reduce juvenile delinquency, lessen neighborhood tension in Latino communities through awareness and role modeling, to provide bilingual assistance to the public, and to bridge the gap between the Latino community and the police.

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